A great play on Frank Lloyd Wright....
    is still waiting to be written.

    Isherwood in the New York Times agrees with me.
    "It’s hard to do much with a play so unrelentingly dour and lacking in either thematic or narrative shape..."
    Kuchwara of AP agrees with me.
    "Richard Nelson's disappointing play, (Frank's Home) which opened Tuesday at off-Broadway's Playwrights Horizons..."
    Winer in Newsday agrees with me.

    "What we do not feel, alas, is more than mildly engaged."

    Remember what I wrote when Frank's Home had its world-premiere? That the script is as flat as a .

    So I continue to wait for a dramatic treatment of the dramatic life of Frank Lloyd Wright. One disappointment in Frank's Home was when Wright gets the telegram that the Imperial Hotel in Tokyo has in fact survived the earthquake, contrary to what he had been told. This moment needed to be a climax, instead it came and went and ruffled little.

    Frank Lloyd Wright! The Opera. It's waiting for you to write it.
    ----
    The Price is Wright.
    In the meantime, if you're in Chicago, see the exhibition on FLW's Price Tower in Bartlesville, OK, at the Chicago Architecture Foundation. If you're in Bartlesville, (and don't say, "I would prefer not to") go see the real thing.

    The exhibition is revelatory. In addition to drawings for Price Tower and some original furniture, it features some large scale drawings of "The Golden Beacon" that Wright planned for Chicago.

    But what really adds zip is the design for the installation of this show in the atrium lobby of the Santa Fe building (1904, D.H. Burnham & Co.) It comes to us from the office of Zaha Hadid. She has designed an addition to Price Tower, which is now an Arts Center. It's good to see 'Zaha' in Chicago. Her dynamic shapes energize the historic Santa Fe lobby.

    All best,
    -EdwardSource URL: http://ecleticsergio.blogspot.com/2007/01/
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Bears vs. Colts

    Bears vs. Colts. Who wins the Super Bowl

    of lighting-the-town?

    Here's Chicago:



    The John Hancock gets high marks for the navy blue, orange and white about 100 stories in the sky. C'mon Indianapolis, let's see you top that!


    The Wrigley looks regal (left.) Tribune Tower isn't in the game.

    Here, you see it better up close. And that's Donald Trump's new Tower encroaching on the left.

    One South Dearborn looks jazzy beaming out over Michigan Avenue.

    Years ago, Saul Bellow wrote, "I am an American, Chicago-born. Chicago, that somber city..."
    Somber no more!

    Even da bridgehouses

    look snazzy, rootin' for da Bears.

    211 Wacker does a lot with just a few colored lightbulbs.

    But it takes more than just a few filaments to light


    a building biggger than a football field,


    or two. The Merchandise Mart.

    And then - our lions. Guarding our cultural treasures inside the Art Institute. They were due to have Bears helmets slapped on them today. (Why? To show that museums are not stuffy places? What do winning sports teams have to do with the preservation of and contemplation of sublimity in a museum?) But the helmets were too small and in the very cold weather they'd have cracked if they'd been forced on. So the lions - and the Art Institute - keep their dignity for one more day.


    So I declare Chicago the winner of the Super Bowl Lighting Derby


    C'mon Indianapolis ?! Beat that.



    bottom photo: Chicago Tribune

    Source URL: http://ecleticsergio.blogspot.com/2007/01/
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    Da Hancock.



    With "da lights" on "da buildings"
    da town's agog for the Super Bowl and da Bears.




    Somehow, (maybe because I saw a nice local collection of Moholy-Nagy and Kurt Schwitters last night) those lines and their angle and the colors look very










    Bauhaus.
    -eSource URL: http://ecleticsergio.blogspot.com/2007/01/
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    The hottest market in the US for office property?
    Chicago shot to the top of the list of the hottest US office property markets last year as investors flocked from the east and west coasts towards cheaper prices in the Windy City. The amount of office property changing hands in downtown Chicago soared to more than 26m square foot last year, nearly tripling from the year before, and shooting past midtown Manhattan’s property market, according to data from Cushman and Wakefield, the property services company.
    Read it in the Financial Times.Source URL: http://ecleticsergio.blogspot.com/2007/01/
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    You sexy architect you !


    Got this in the mail today. FastLife.com sends this card to the media, no doubt for Valentine's Day. They say their studies show that for women the top five sexiest professions are

    1. Athlete
    2. Fireman
    3. Doctor
    4. Architect
    5. Model

    I knew I should have been an athlete.

    67% of women think architects are sexy! And 89% of women think architects are "dateable"! Only 68% of men want to date an architect.

    What do men really want? Acc. to FastLife men find the following sexy:
    1. Model
    2. Dancer
    3. Flight Attendant
    4. Athlete
    5. Musician

    Hm, dunno about that. But tell your spouse/partner, in case he/she, doesn't know/forgot, just how sexy architects are.

    -ESource URL: http://ecleticsergio.blogspot.com/2007/01/
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He said, She said

    "Always design...."





    "Always design a thing by considering it in its next larger context -
    a chair in a room, a room in a house, a house in an environment,
    an environment in a city plan."

    - Finnish Architect Eliel SaarinenSource URL: http://ecleticsergio.blogspot.com/2007/01/
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Rudolf Stingel at the MCA in Chicago

    Do you like Orange?
    Rudolf Stingel
    at Chicago's Museum of Contemporary Art;
    later going to the Whitney.

    Stingel covered the main foyer with silvery insulation, added a gaudy chandelier and a cornice on top to make the room more classically proportioned.

    It's amazing how this kunsthalle can change its atmosphere so thoroughly. It makes it thrilling to return often. With each incarnation you layer the memories in your mind; and your relationship to the space deepens. As when you watch a child grow through phases.

    In the first gallery on the left,

    enter - a 'color field' room.

    You might think you don't like orange carpet, but this room warms the heart, feels very still and quiet and comfortable. People will lie down in here and calmness will reign!

    It's nice to see a room not filled with 'things'. Especially in a museum.

    On those walls covered with

    shiny metallic film

    people are invited to scrawl,


    This began unintentionally at a previous Stingel show elsewhere. But is this the first time museum goers embed objects in a Stingel wall?

    The least successful room holds a very large and very foreshortened self-portrait.


    If you still think you don't like orange, there's another gallery with a white carpet. This one is on the wall. And people write in it with their finger.


    Reminded me somehow of a wall in Jerusalem. People put notes in that too. But would that make this religious somehow? Well, it is. See the next two posts. And all good art is.

    And that orange, it's like a beautiful g-dgiven sunset.Source URL: http://ecleticsergio.blogspot.com/2007/01/
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    Return to the Jazz Age?

    On my way to the Art Institute last night, to see the winners of this year's Chicago Prize, and for the lecture by Marion Weiss - of recent Olympic Sculpture Park in Seattle fame, (more on both events later) I looked up, as I always do, and saw


    One South Dearborn by Jim DeStefano, Rick Keating and Partners, beaming the colors of the Super Bowl - bound Chicago Bears over the stately Michigan Avenue streetwall. Even if you don't know what they're for, the colors spread cheer on a cold winter night.
    -E
    Source URL: http://ecleticsergio.blogspot.com/2007/01/
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Architecture is undervalued

    People are wondering why Gustav Klimt's Adele Bloch-Bauer sold for a reported $135 million. Some ask if that was that too much. Some, like me, don't think so. The painting is one-of-a-kind unfathomably great, full of mystery.


    But my question is, how can that painting go for $135 million,
    and another masterpiece by an undeniably top-ranked artist,
    another work that ushered in the modern era,
    another work full of love for a woman,


    The Farnsworth House by Ludwig Mies van der Rohe -
    how come that sold at auction in 2003 for only around $ 7.5 million?!

    It even has land attached!

    How can "Adele" be worth $135 million and "Edith" only $7.5 million?

    I'd rather have the Farnsworth. And with all the money I'd save I'd buy lots of Windex.

    -ESource URL: http://ecleticsergio.blogspot.com/2007/01/
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    Does the skyline matter?

    I was a news reporter long enough to see that even in remote rural villages abroad, people have learned the importance of getting your message onto TV. Rather than holding a demonstration where the local politicians will see it, and rather than holding up signs for the local politicians to see, people know to alert the media, and hold up signs for the cameras to see. That's what's important today, that's how to get your message out, and to make your case known around the world.

    So too with urban planning I fear. Today much of it is made to look good in photographs, either to sell real estate, or to put in brochures to lure tourists. And too often the way it looks in pictures is less successful than the way places and spaces actually work.

    For thirty years Chicago has been diluting its once-wondrous skyline. We've put up gargantuan pre-fab concrete monstrosities, 'homogenizing' the skyscape of Louis Sullivan, Bruce Graham, Fazlur Khan, Mies van der Rohe and others. For thirty years Chicago's city leaders seemed not to care enough about the effect a beautiful skyline can have on the eyes.

    But now they seem to care. About how it will look to the eye of the camera. They're pitching as part of their 2016 Olympics bid, a rowing competition on Lake Michigan, just east of the downtown skyline. And the cameras will be a little farther out in the lake, looking back towards the city.

    So now they understand the value of a dramatic skyline. It may not have been important enough to assure for the people who live here. But in order to attract investment, it's critical.

    Going forward, let's hope they work for the most meaningful skyline we can have. And not just for the two weeks of the Olympic images.Source URL: http://ecleticsergio.blogspot.com/2007/01/
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A womb with a view




    I love this image of a cooling tower.
    Anybody know where it is?
    It has that sexy shape


    Reminds me also of a maypole, which is very sexy, ja Sigmund? Or the structure of

    a hoop dress - an exciting structure - which reminds me of

    the Reichstag dome (which gives new meaning to the ventilator inside it.)

    It shows that the state is the protector, in Berlin above, and at London's City Hall,



    or under any dome.

    Isn't it all just a modern version of


    the medieval protectress?

    Does this show a wish to go back to the womb?

    The dome over the U.S. Capitol telegraphs its symbolism

    with a statue of a woman on top

    "Armed Freedom."

    If it were carved in modern times we might have as a mascot


    "Armed and Legged Freedom."


    'Dome', from 'domus', which means house.



    hoop dress photos from "The Consolation of Poetry" by Barbara Neri.
    (1st photo: Glenn Bering, 2nd photo: Phil Linsalata) Source URL: http://ecleticsergio.blogspot.com/2007/01/
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    "Master" planning?

    Here's the new sketch for Chicago's proposed Olympic Village. The Mayor wants to build something like this whether he gets the 2016 games or not.


    Looks okay, obviously this is just conceptual. The very talented Ross Wimer of Skidmore, Owings and Merrill is on the case.

    But wait a second! This reminds me of buildings that stood just blocks from here, buildings we're tearing down now - buildings hated, reviled - buildings and planning we blame for destroying lives ----
    The Robert Taylor Homes. Public Housing.


    Yes, the economics would be different, and the buildings would be superior, but I still find the comparison too close for comfort in so many ways.

    -EdwardSource URL: http://ecleticsergio.blogspot.com/2007/01/
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    I've been enjoying Richard Lacayo's new blog. He likens

    Walter Gropius' The Monument to the March Dead, (1922) to


    The Sea of Ice (1824) by another German, Caspar David Friedrich.

    I find that's brilliant. But I find it also reminds me of something else.

    Daniel Libeskind's addition to the Denver Art Museum (2006).

    Libeskind lived in Germany too.Source URL: http://ecleticsergio.blogspot.com/2007/01/
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